Money Lessons From The 1%

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No matter how much money you have, you will have to save, spend, and invest to get by in life. This is exactly what the world’s richest 1% do with their money as well – it’s just that they have a bit more cash with which they can save, spend, and invest. So, seeing as everyone in the world is doing the exact same things with their money, doesn’t it make sense that we all treat our money and finances as if we were rich? We’re just limited to exactly how much we can save, spend, and invest.

Many financial advisors believe that we should be looking after our money in the same way that the richest 1% do. It’s these financial strategies and tips that helped the world’s richest people become rich in the first place, so following in their example should also help you to strengthen your current financial situation.

So, ready to act like you are one of the privileged 1%? Here is exactly what you need to do.

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Use Credit Smartly

The rich aren’t that worried about using credit because they know that they are in a position in which they will find it easy to repay it. However, they also understand that they need to be smart when they do use credit. When you use credit correctly and wisely, it can be a great tool to help you build up a considerable amount of wealth. In fact, this is probably how these people became rich in the first place. So, don’t be scared about using credit to give your finances a bit of a boost. But you do need to remember that credit is never completely without risks. Make sure that you are only using credit that you know you can definitely pay back. Otherwise, you could end up spiralling into a significant amount of debt.

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Invest In Physical Assets

Sure, stocks, shares, and funds all make very worthy investments for your money. But one thing that the rich and wealthy 1% know on top of this is that it is also worth investing in some physical and tangible assets. The main investment this covers is real estate. Adding some real estate to your investments, such as one of the properties offered by Meriton, can really help to create a well-rounded portfolio. You just need to figure out then what to do with it – do you want to keep it for yourself or rent it out to tenants for a monthly income? Whichever one you go with will probably depend on your current situation and whether you have the time to dedicate to a rental property.

Always Consider Tax
Whenever you make an investment, you need to consider how this is going to affect your annual taxes. As your investments will (hopefully!) be making a profit, this will go towards your income. A higher income means that you will be required to pay more taxes at the end of the year. Thankfully, there are ways you can get around this and reduce your yearly tax bill. You just need to make sure that you are investing your money in places that won’t bring you too many tax implications. If you aren’t exactly sure how your investments are going to affect your taxes, you should speak to a financial advisor about this.

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Work Towards Long-Term Goals

All of the 1% know one very important secret: to get the best returns on your money, you need to work towards long-term goals rather than short-term ones. One way to start to work towards your long-term goals is to save before you spend. Many of us use our monthly wages and then save the cash that we have left over at the end of the month. But you should really be doing this the other way around – saving and then spending whatever you have leftover. This way you can guarantee that there is enough money going into your savings and investments so that they can set you up for some really impressive gains in the future. It’s also important that you have a personal pension in place so that you can reap plenty of financial benefits once you have quit work and are retired.

So, as you can see, you don’t really have to be rich to manage your money and finances as if you are part of the 1%. You just need to use your money wisely and ensure that you think carefully before you take any financial risks.